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Environmental Archaeology, ISSN 1461-4103, 01/2017, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp. 56 - 78
The first large-scale archaeobotanical study in Britain, conducted from 1899 to 1909 by Clement Reid and Arthur Lyell at Silchester, provided the first... 
Roman Britain | Clement Reid | Roman Plant Foods | Silchester | Archaeobotany | GEOSCIENCES, MULTIDISCIPLINARY | PLANT FOODS | ARCHAEOLOGY
Journal Article
Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, 9/2014, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp. 543 - 549
Our understanding of the introduction and adoption of new plant foods in Roman Britain is currently limited by a lack of data from a group of Late Iron Age... 
Excavations | Herbs | Iron age | Diet | Food economics | Plants | Amphorae | Food consumption | Food | Condiments | Archaeology | Earth Sciences | Biogeosciences | Climate Change | Anthropology | Roman Britain | Oppida | Late Iron Age Britain | Paleontology | Silchester | FRANCE | PLANT SCIENCES | EUROPE | PALEONTOLOGY | ROMAN | PERIOD | REMAINS | ACCESS | International economic relations | Fertilizer industry | Buildings and facilities | Flavoring essences | Food plants | Seeds | Celery | Iron Age | Flavorings | Iron | Age
Journal Article
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